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Examples of Non-Federal Resource Partners

Examples of Non-Federal Resource Partners for Obtaining, Preparing, or Distributing Fruits and Vegetables

  • Parent Teacher Association (PTA)/Parent Teacher Organization PTO) representatives may be able to help prepare or distribute fruits and vegetables.
  • Local farmers may be a source for fruits and vegetables.
  • Local produce companies or grocery stores may be able to supply pre-cut, ready-to-eat fruit and vegetable trays. The FFVP permits purchasing these “value-added” items to save on labor costs and even permits payment of a delivery fee if necessary.
  • Family and Consumer Sciences (FACS) students may be able to assist with the preparation of fruits and vegetables.
  • Selected students from each classroom or from the general student body may be able to assist with the distribution of fruits and vegetables.

Examples of Non-Federal Resource Partners to Provide Nutrition Education

  • Local dietitians may be able to provide nutrition lessons to classrooms.
  • PTA/PTO groups may assist in supporting nutrition education activities, providing fruit and vegetable nutrition messages in parent newsletters, etc.
  • Local fruit and vegetable producer associations may be able to assist in providing classroom presentations, assemblies and education materials.
  • Farmers markets may be willing to provide tours or classroom speakers or set up mock farmers markets.
  • Local farmers may be able to provide classroom presentations, gardening activities, tours, etc.
  • Local produce companies or grocery stores may provide guest speakers or chefs, education materials, classroom discussions, tours, assemblies, etc.
  • Extension Agents may be able to provide nutrition education lessons or gardening activities. One Pennsylvania elementary school had students grow and then prepare and eat their own beans and mushrooms.
  • Peers can provide effective nutrition messages. One school had students take turns broadcasting announcements via closed circuit TV about the nutrition benefits and history of the fruit or vegetable of the day while the snack was being delivered to classrooms.
  • Family and Consumer Science students may be able to provide nutrition education to elementary students in their district. A Pennsylvania’s high school FACS students prepared three different types of beets for elementary students and taught the students where beets grow, how to cook beets, as well as beets’ nutritional benefits.
  • Local restaurateurs or other professionals may be willing to volunteer to do a cooking demonstration or lesson. One school hosted an African culture and cuisine writer who met with students to discuss how African foods migrated to the US. Students then participated in making and tasting plantains.​